Signs, Wonders, and Miracles

Have you ever wondered about Miracles, Signs and Wonders? The Bible is full of stories about supernatural happenings and miraculous testimonies. Personally I have always understood the word miracle to mean something that was, ‘supernatural, or beyond human possibilities or natural law’. However, reading the Bible and noting its diverse usage of these words made me wonder: ‘What’s the Bible’s definition of the word miracle, sign and wonder?’ Or, ‘What’s the difference, if any at all, between these three words?’ I felt like I could easily describe to someone what a miracle was, but I wasn’t quite sure how to describe a sign or wonder to someone. Actually I couldn’t really explain the difference in these words to myself, even though I could recite countless verses containing them. After musing over these words and some of their occurrences in the Bible for a while, I decided to dig in deeper and get some answers. I actually composed a word study on miracles as project in GSSM.[1] So if you are interested in these words, I tried to organize all my findings as best as possible. I hope you enjoy these observations, and they help you get some answers on miracles signs and wonders. *All verses are in the ESV unless otherwise noted.

First let’s look at the beginning of Hebrews chapter 2. These verses mention all three words, and say that God bore witness to us concerning salvation by signs, wonders and miracles. This passage gives us an idea concerning one of the initial purposes for miracles, signs and wonders. Let me quote the text verses 3 and 4, “how shall we escape if we neglect such a great salvation? It was declared at first by the Lord, and it was attested to us by those who heard, while God also bore witness by signs and wonders and various miracles and by gifts of the Holy Spirit distributed according to his will.” [2]

Hebrews 2:4 is a great place to start because it’s actually the only verse in the Bible that contains all three words (signs, wonders and miracles) within the same verse. One could argue that the words: signs, wonders and miracles used here all have the same meaning, but I don’t believe that’s the case. The fact that all these words are listed separately implies that they must each have their own separate and unique meaning. Otherwise the verse would have most likely been shortened down to say something like, “while God also bore witness by miracles and gifts of the Holy Spirit distributed according to his will,” completely skipping the other two words to keep from being redundant. No, I believe all these words where specifically chosen, God breathed words, and for the author of Hebrews to list each of one of them individually shows they each must have separate distinctive meanings.

If these three words do in fact have separate meanings, doing a separate word study on each word by itself first, then looking at the three words together will allow us to differentiate their individual definitions. Before I jump into that, there is actually a fourth word that needs to be introduced and added to the list: work. This word is used 188 times in the ESV, but 88 of those occurrences all come from the same Greek word. That Greek word for work will be our fourth study word. Before I look up the original Greek word meanings and look at other sources, here is a quick reference table of our four words, showing their Greek origin and a short definition from the Dictionary of Biblical Languages With Semantic Domains : Greek (New Testament)[3]

 

English Word

Modern Greek

Original Greek

Short Definition

Miracles

Dunamis

1

- ability, power, mighty deed, ruler, supernatural power, meaning

Signs

Semeion

2

- sign

Wonders

Teras

4

- portent, wonder, miracle

Works

Ergon

6

- act, work, workmanship

 

 

When doing a word study on a specific word in the Bible there are many steps that can improve your knowledge of the word and help your exegesis. I will walk you through some of the steps I usually use, but if you study in a different manor or order feel free to skip around and compile your own method of Bible word studies. I will walk through some of my steps for miracle, then just the results for the word studies on the remaining three words.

First Word: Miracles

You may want to start with the immediate context in the verse(s) around the word you are studying. Begin to hypothesize its meaning using the surrounding words and sentences. Try to come up with a working definition of the word you are studying. Maybe even re-write the verse, replacing the study word with your best definition in your own words. For example I would re-write Heb. 2:4 as, “while God also bore witness by signs and wonders and various [miracles]supernatural acts that were beyond human possibilities and by gifts of the Holy Spirit distributed according to his will,” to fill in my definition of miracles in the verse. This helps get a starting point, and it forces you to write out your assumptions of the study word’s definition. Let’s see if my working definition changes after some more research.

For me, reading and studying multiple or all other verses that contain the same word you are studying is a must. A good concordance will list all the words in the Bible and their occurrences by verse reference. In the ESV, the word miracle shows up 5 times in the O.T. and 7 times in the N.T. This is a short list and I recommend reading all 12 verses, O.T. as well. (Old Testament: Exod 4:21, Exod 7:9, 1 Chron 16:12, Ps 105:5, Ps 105:27. New Testament Verses: Acts 8:13; Acts 19:11; 1 Cor 12:10; 1 Cor 12:28; 1 Cor 12:29; Gal 3:5; Heb 2:4) Comparing these other occurrences can help give insight into miracle’s true meaning. Typically you should first look at other occurrences in the same book, but there’s only one occurrence in the book of Hebrews. Next you should compare other occurrences by the same author. While the original author of Hebrews is unknown, Bible scholars generally ascribe it to the Apostle Paul. So, we can compare our Heb 2:4 verse with the 3 references in 1 Corinthians and the Galatians verse (1 Cor 12:10; 1 Cor 12:28; 1 Cor 12:29; Gal 3:5). Lastly we want to look at other occurrences in the same time period, so we look at the verses in Acts (Acts 813; Acts 19:11). You can even compare other occurrences of the study word in non-biblical literature that was written in the same time period to get a more secular idea of what it means. Before I do that, here are some of my thoughts on miracles from reading these verses.

Results from the verses listed above:

Non-Biblical Literature from the New Testament time period can be a little hard to find. However, I was able to find a few writings from around the time of the New Testament that may be helpful. Plato actually wrote on the word dunamis saying it was ‘the absolute mark of being.’[4] In many ways Plato helped birth Greek’s culture into philosophy, and thus his ideas greatly influenced Greek citizen’s thinking and beliefs at the time. This shows us that around 300 B.C.E. there were Greek philosophies that believed dunamis acts were essential and proved people existed. (Plato and his protégé Aristotle where Greek philosophers that among other things questioned the actual existence of the world in their writings) I don’t know exactly how popular Plato’s writings were when the book of Hebrews was written, but we can assume his writings were known by at least some of the Greek population, and may have influenced their vocabulary and even their diction. Any original Greek writings using dunamis are helpful to perceive how the original word was used in early New Testament times.

Plato and other philosophers of this time period rarely spoke on God’s power, but they did write quite often on the existence of a Deity. While their writings may be complicated, I believe that they really affected the Greek concept of ‘God’ during their lives. Our dictionary today is slightly edited from time to time as word meanings and definitions are and influenced even changed by how people talk and use words. The point is: When ever studying the Bible and trying to apply it to our lives today, I think it’s important to first correctly determine its application to its first readers. Meaning – deciding what a verse or a passage first meant to its original Greek readers back in 100C.E. will allow help you see what the passage first meant, and this will help you when trying to apply it to our world today.

Now the next step is to look up the original Greek word used to translate the word you are studying. This can be done by using a Strong’s concordance, a Goodrick-Kohlenberger concordance, or even a parallel Bible with the translations, ESV and original Greek text linked together. Personally I prefer the latter; it’s actually called the ESV English-Greek Reverse Interlinear New/Old Testament[5]and I recommend them if it’s available to you. Here’s a picture of the parallel version:

reverse_interlinear_example_pic.jpg

However you can use any interlinear Bible, or a Strong’s or G/K concordance will do just fine. Actually most interlinear Bibles are keyed to a number system using either Strong’s or G/K. For example the red numbers in the picture above are Strong’s numbers. If you look up Heb 2:4 in an interlinear Bible, or look up the word miracles from this verse in a Strong’s concordance you will find its number to be: 1411 (1539 if you are using the Goodrick-Kohlenberger number system).

The original Greek word is:

G1411_miracle.jpgor in Modern Greek: Dunamis.[6]

Your next step is using a Bible lexicon to get a definition of this Greek word dunamis. Note: a lexicon is basically the vocabulary of a language, so in our case, a Bible lexicon is like a dictionary that list Hebrew and Greek words but defines the words in English.

The Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon shows us that dunamis is a noun and defines dunamis as: “1 strength power, ability. 1a) inherent power, power residing in a thing by virtue of its nature, or which a person or thing exerts and puts forth. 1b) power for performing miracles 1c) moral power and excellence of soul 1d) the power and influence which belong to riches and wealth 1e) power and resources arising from numbers 1f) power consisting in or resting upon armies, forces, hosts”[7] The Dictionary of Biblical Domains defines dunamis while giving a verse next to each sub definition as: “1. ability, to perform an activity (2Co 1:8); 2. power (Ac 1:8); 3. mighty deed, miracle (Ac 2:22); 4. ruler, human ruler (Ro 8:38); 5. supernatural power (Mt 24:29; Mk 13:25; Lk 21:26; Eph 1:21; Ro 8:38); 6. meaning, what is intended (1Co 14:11).”[8]  While there are slightly different meanings this word can have, most of them have to do with power and ability. This is usually used in the Gospels to describe the supernatural acts of Jesus because the word dunamis, when used referring to Jesus “discloses what He can do“.[9] Each definition is really just different types and forms of power. This changes my perspective on our verse. Before reading these definitions I thought miracle as in Heb 2:4 meant ‘a supernatural act’ but after reading these lexicons I found it’s actually a little different. It means something more like ‘possessing or having the ability of power to do something mighty or of importance.’ In the Hebrews 2:4 verse my best re-write of the study word miracles in the verse would now be: “while God also bore witness by signs and wonders and various [miracles] demonstrations of His ability and supernatural power He possessed to perform mighty acts and by gifts of the Holy Spirit distributed according to his will”. I know that’s a long definition for one word, but the more descriptive and specific you are in re-writing verses in your own words, the easier it is to understand what exactly the original word means.

After you do this, you may want a new list of verses and occurrences: a list of all the occurrences of dunamis. Actually you might want to do this step in your word study before you look up your word in a concordance. Here’s why: When you look up a word like miracle in a Bible concordance, it will list all the verses that contain that word. That’s good, but this doesn’t necessarily give you an accurate list of the same word as the word in your verse. In our example, looking up miracle in concordance gives you 12 references. These 12 verses are: all the occurrences that original Hebrew and Greek scripture most closely translate into the English word miracle, in whichever translation you are reading! This is just a complied list of the same English word, which has nothing to do with the original meaning. I don’t mean to be a heart breaker if you love your concordance, but it’s important to know they don’t always give you a list of the same word. (At least not the same original word) What you really want is to get a list of all the occurrences of the Hebrew root word you are studying. In our case we want all the occurrences of dunamis in the New Testament and how it’s translated in the ESV.

Here’s the results: Dunamis, is used 119 times in the New Testament! Seven of those times were translated ‘miracle’ in our ESV version and we can thank our concordance for giving us a list of those seven verses, but what about the other 112 times? It’s actually translated into many different English words. Here’s how its translated all 119 times: ‘power’ – 90 times, ‘mighty work’ – 13 times, ‘miracles’ – 7, ‘strength’ – 2, ‘means’ – 2, ‘meaning’ – 1, ‘mighty’ – 1, ‘ability’ – 1, ‘powerfully’ – 1, and ‘miraculous powers’ – 1. You can see how this gives us much more accurate and different information then a concordance. (See what we could have missed by just using a concordance?) You can also see that most often, dunamis translates to ‘power’ in English. Actually 3 out of 4 times dunamis is translated ‘power’, and ‘miracle’ is really a scarce translation for this word! This list helps us see how the translators and writers who originally composed today’s modern ESV Bible choose to translate this word.

My best interpretation of this word in the Hebrews 2:4 verse would be: “while God also bore witness by signs and wonders and various [miracles] demonstrations of His ability and supernatural power He possessed to perform mighty acts and by gifts of the Holy Spirit distributed according to”.

 

Let’s move on to Signs:

The original Greek word is:  3   In Modern Greek: Semeion.[10]

(Strong’s number: 4592 G/K: 4956)

Concordance Results: The word signs is used 81 times in the New Testament. I won’t list all the verses, but here are a few notes I took from a few references:

Lexicon definition: Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance defines semeion as: “1) a sign, mark, token. 1a) that by which a person or a thing is distinguished from others and is known. 1b) a sign, prodigy, portent, i.e. an unusual occurrence, transcending the common course of nature. 1b1) of signs portending remarkable events soon to happen. 1b2) of miracles and wonders by which God authenticates the men sent by him, or by which men prove that the cause they are pleading is God’s.” It also says that semeion comes from the verb word semaino, which means: “1) to give a sign, to signify, indicate. 2 to make known.”[11] These definitions seem to indicate that semeion has somewhat of a visual aspect to it. In English, a sign is usually a visual form of information or direction. For example, a soccer match is made up of two teams of players, one team all wearing one color jerseys, the other team all wearing another color. The goal-keeper of both teams wears a special jersey that is a different color then either team’s jerseys. We could say that, ‘his specially colored clothes are a sign that he is a goal-keeper, and shows all the other players that he is different and can use his hands in the match.’ In much the same way, Jesus performed many miracles and the acts that were a sign to His supernatural power and authority.

Semeion/sign seems to always have a visual aspect to the event it is describing. Not that you couldn’t see a dunamis/ miracle, but a semeion/sign is an action or an event that you may be able to see, but it also indirectly makes something else known. Let me try to explain this difference between semeion/sign and dunamis/miracle. Take story of Jesus feeding the five thousand for example in John 6. The word semeion/sign is used to describe the multiplication of the food. Now, the multiplication of food is defiantly a miraculous event, and the definition of dunamis/miracle seems like it would be a good fit here, but the word semeion is used. I believe the reason is this: Semeionis usually used to describe a miraculous event, but specifically when there is an emphasis on something else, secondary to the miracle performed. When Jesus multiplied the food, this action showed the five thousand people that he had power and ability to create out of nothing. It also showed that He was compassionate for the people’s needs, and that He could provide for them without natural means. Some of the nature and personality of Jesus is revealed here as well as His power. In short, using semeion does two things, describes a miraculous happening, and reveals something else. I believe it is this indirect message, or secondary purpose that the word semeion/sign reveals that distinguishes it from the word dunamis/miracle. After the people saw what Jesus did they said, “This is indeed the Prophet who is to come into the world!” (John 6:14)

The first definition from the lexicon defined Semeion as: “a sign, mark, or token.”[12]  It is important to note that this word was used for non-supernatural things, much like we use the word sign today. Luke 2:12 says, “And this will be a sign for you: you will find a baby wrapped in swaddling cloths and lying in a manger.” (Luke 2:12 emphasis added) There is nothing supernatural about a baby in swaddling clothes. This shows us that the word semeion/sign can be referring to a non-miraculous event. However in the verse above, the word sign had a secondary meaning. It wasn’t just referring to what the baby was wearing, but it also implied that, when the shepherds saw a baby, specifically one that would be wearing swaddling clothes and lying in a manger, then they would know He was the Savior Christ the Lord. This statement acted as assurance to the shepherds that what the angels were saying was true. When they saw the baby Jesus, just as the Angels described, they were likely to believe all that the angels said.

Lastly, here is a list of all the different English words that are used in the ESV translated from semeion: sign. Yep that’s it, every time semeion is used in the original Greek it’s written as sign in the ESV! There are 77 occurrences of this word in the Greek New Testament.

My best interpretation of this word in the Hebrews 2:4 verse would be: “while God also bore witness by [sign] acts, some of which that were supernatural, that where performed for us to see and secondarily revealed aspects of God’s power and nature to us and wonders and various miracles and by gifts of the Holy Spirit distributed according to”.

 

Next word Wonders:

The original Greek word is: 5Or in Modern Greek: Teras.[13]

(Strong’s number 5059, G/K 5469)

Concordance Results: The word wonders is used 24 times in the New Testament. I won’t list all the verses, but here are a few notes I took from some of the references:

Lexicon definition: Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance: “1) a prodigy, portent. 2) miracle: performed by any one.” The New American Standard describes it as: “a wonder, marvel.”[14] So far, these definitions will make it hard to differentiate between the word teras/wonders and dunamis/miracles. So I will move on to other sources.

The Theological Dictionary of the New Testament tells us that during New Testament times, this word was rarely used by the secular people outside of the practicing Jewish community. But to devote Jews this word was well known and, “it [teras] had at this time been given a special accent referring it to God’s self-revelation as the Creator and the Governor of all events, and especially of the destiny of the people chosen by Him”.[15] However, in contrast to dunamis/miracles and semeion/signs, teras/wonders most often stressed God as the creator of the supernatural act, not Jesus or the Holy Spirit. It seems this word was designed to describe miraculous acts of God the Father-head of the trinity. Perhaps it means something along the lines as: ‘a miraculous event that was performed by God Himself’.

It is also interesting that the word teras/wonders never occurs by its self, without the word semeion/signs in the same sentence. Every occurrence in the New Testament of teras/wonders is this way. In contrast however, semeion/signs occurs by its self many times. This would imply that teras/wonders is something that God chooses to perform in conjunction with signs. We can assume that teras/wonder means something like: ‘a miraculous act God performs together with a sign.’ Looking at some actual verses will help us define teras/wonders more accurately.

Mat. 24:24 and Mark 13:22 says that, false Christ and false prophets will arise and perform great signs and wonders to lead people astray. We can infer from these verses that teras/wonder can be used to describe acts that man does, as well as acts of God. This word was also used to describe wonders that the apostles did. This adds to the point that ‘wonders’ was not used to describe acts of Jesus.

Another verse worth citing is Acts 2:19. “And I will show wonders in the heavens above and signs on the earth below,” This gives teras/wonders a ‘heavenly’ location and describes signs as acts on the earth below. The reference to heaven here could mean either: the sky, space and air above the earth, or the realm where God and other heavenly beings abide. Either one, teras/wonders has a specific, different meaning then signs.

Original Greek Results: Teras, is used 16 times in the New Testament. Ever occurrence from the original Greek is translated into wonders.

My best interpretation of this word in the Hebrews 2:4 verse would be “while God also bore witness by signs and [wonders] supernatural acts performed by God in conjunction with signs that He simultaneously performed and various miracles and by gifts of the Holy Spirit distributed according to”.

 

Last Word Works:

The original Greek word is: 7 Or in Modern-Greek:  Ergon.[16]

(Strong’s number: 2041. G/K: 2240)

Concordance Results: The word works is used 188 times in the New Testament. I won’t list all the verses, but here are a few notes I took from some of the references:

Lexicon definition:  The Enhanced Strong’s Lexicon defines this word as: “1) business, employment, that which any one is occupied. 1A) that which one undertakes to do, enterprise, undertaking. 2) any product whatever, any thing accomplished by hand, art, industry, or mind. 3) an act, deed, thing done: the idea of working is emphasized in opp. to that which is less than work.” This easily translates into our English word ‘work’, but is there a deeper meaning to this Greek word? The word ‘work’ had a slightly different meaning in OT times then it does today. The Theological Dictionary of the New Testament tells us that this word was very common in the time of Homer and Hesiod. It seems in their time ergon had a meaning that portrayed active action and zeal instead of just labor or occupation, as people today in the 21st century might perceive ‘work’. It also meant ‘useful activity’ opposed to useless busyness or idleness.[17] To me, many Americans have a predetermined definition of ‘work’ as: some repetitive, meaningless labor, bland and passionless; however this is not in the least bit what ergon means. Ergon is: work for a purpose; for life itself. It emphasizes actively working in expectation of return. For example, a farmer planting a crop in expectation of receiving a harvest in season, would be ergon/work. In fact The Theological Dictionary of the New Testament tells us that this Greek word originated from a Hebrew word often times meaning: ‘to plow’.[18]

Let’s look at some verses. When Jesus healed the lame man at the pool of Bethesda in John 5, the Jews began to persecute Him because the healing took place on a Sabbath. In response to them Jesus says, “My Father is working [ergon] until now, and I am working [ergon].”[19] There are many miraculous healings and supernatural acts of Jesus where ergon/works is used in the New Testament, but this verse shows us something else. With ergon meaning ‘active’ work, this attributes God as a pro-active, non-passive God. God was actively working supernaturally in behalf of His people before the time of Jesus on the earth, and He continues to do so. He is not a passive God who sits on His throne and waits around with no earthly intervention, and I believe this was Jesus’ point here in John 5. Colossians tells us that in Jesus the ‘fullness of God was pleased to dwell,’ so we can look at Jesus’.[20] If that’s so, we can look at Jesus’ life on earth as an accurate representation of God’s character.

What’s the purpose of ergon/works? Mat. 5:14-16 answers that, “You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works [ergon] and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.” Works are to give glory to God the Father in heaven. That’s their purpose: to bring glory to God, and to position us in adoration and praise for Him. Jesus also indicated that after He left, the intensity of the ergon/works of God performed on earth through men should increase saying, “And greater works than these will he [God the Father] show him [Jesus, referring to himself], so that you may marvel.” (Jn 5:20) We are to continue the works of Jesus as the Holy Spirit enables us and God the Father reveals to us. But we are not to stop at or expect just the same works that Jesus did, but we are to expect today those and greater works then those Jesus did!

Another passage worth mentioning is John 6:28-29, “Then they said to him, “What must we do, to be doing the works [ergon]of God?” Jesus answered them, “This is the work [ergon] of God, that you believe in him whom he has sent.” Here Jesus teaches the amazed crowd who saw with their own eyes Jesus multiple the food. They wanted to know how to do these acts, and Jesus’ answer is to: ’believe in God’. Jesus goes on to reference the manna that was provided for the Israelites when they left the oppression of Pharaoh saying that it was not Moses who provided it, but God. God is the provider and it is His power that performs these works, not man. However, many times God chooses to perform His works through the hands of His people.

Original Greek Results: Ergon is used 166 times in the original Greek Text of the New Testament. The ESV translates ergon to: ‘work’ – 121 times, ‘deed’ – 26 times, ‘what’ – 3 times, ‘done’ – 3 times, ‘thing’ – 2 times, ‘undertaking’ 1 time, ‘well-doing’ 1 time, ‘conduct’ – 1 time, ‘workmanship’ – 1 time, ‘do’ – 1 time, ‘labor’ – 1 time, ‘doing’ – 1 time, ‘task’ – 1 time, ‘good’ – 1 time, ‘effect’ 1 time, and ‘acts’ – 1 time.

 Let us boldly rely on God to work supernatural miracles, signs, wonders and works through us to give Him the glory due to His name! We should praise God for all the works He has already performed, and live in constant expectation of more!

Other Notes: (Keep in mind if you are reading this, you are most likely reading the Bible in English, which is a translation from its original language. I believe the word of God is God breathed and infallible, period. But the translation of His word may not always be completely infallible, simply because it’s a translation from the original to another language. This translating process (into what we read today in different Bible translations and versions) is subject to the translator’s opinions and assumptions and this effects how they compose the writings into English. That’s why we have some many different Bible versions today. One group of translators thinks a verse is best written one way in English and another group translators like it another way. But no worries… unless you can read Biblical Hebrew and Greek, English is the next best thing. : ) I’m not saying we should all learn Old Testament Hebrew and Greek in order to read the Bible. I cannot read original Hebrew fluently by any means. I think God even teaches us each individually and He wants us to learn in a language we know and are familiar with. For me, I love the ESV, I think its great, and it translates on a more of ‘word for word’ basis. But if you love another version, go for it! God wants to speak to you in a familiar language, that’s easy for you to understand. Some versions today use a ‘phrase for phrase’ or ‘concept for concept’ instead of a ‘word for word’ translating style. Its great to have a mixture of Bible versions of both types of translating styles that you can compare. This can really help when trying to find what God was saying then and now whenever you are interpreting and applying the Bible for today.

Revised 2009. By David Causer

Endnotes:

1. Global School of Supernatural Ministry, 2007 at Global Awakening’s ministry in Harrisburg, PA.

2. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. Wheaton, Standard Bible Society, 2001. Heb. 2:3-4 (ESV, emphasis added)

3. Swanson, James: Dictionary of Biblical Languages With Semantic Domains : Greek (New Testament). electronic ed. Oak Harbor : Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997, S.

4. Sophocles, of Athens (496–406 b.c.), the real poet of the Athens of Pericles, ed. A. C. Pearson, 1924.

5. Schwandt, John ; Collins, C. John: The ESV English-Greek Reverse Interlinear New Testament. Logos Research Systems, Inc., 2006.

6. Strong, James: The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible : Showing Every Word of the Text of the Common English Version of the Canonical Books, and Every Occurrence of Each Word in Regular Order. electronic ed. Ontario : Woodside Bible Fellowship., 1996.

7. Strong, James: The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible : Showing Every Word of the Text of the Common English Version of the Canonical Books, and Every Occurrence of Each Word in Regular Order. electronic ed. Ontario : Woodside Bible Fellowship., 1996, S. G1411

8. Swanson, James: Dictionary of Biblical Languages With Semantic Domains : Greek (New Testament). electronic ed. Oak Harbor : Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997, S. GGK1539

9. Kittel, Gerhard (Hrsg.) ; Bromiley, Geoffrey William (Hrsg.) ; Friedrich, Gerhard (Hrsg.): Theological Dictionary of the New Testament. electronic ed. Grand Rapids, MI : Eerdmans, 1964-c1976, S. 8:124

10. Strong, James: The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible : Showing Every Word of the Text of the Common English Version of the Canonical Books, and Every Occurrence of Each Word in Regular Order. electronic ed. Ontario : Woodside Bible Fellowship., 1996, S. G4592

11. Strong, James: The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible : Showing Every Word of the Text of the Common English Version of the Canonical Books, and Every Occurrence of Each Word in Regular Order. electronic ed. Ontario : Woodside Bible Fellowship., 1996, S. G4591

12. Strong, James: The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible : Showing Every Word of the Text of the Common English Version of the Canonical Books, and Every Occurrence of Each Word in Regular Order. electronic ed. Ontario : Woodside Bible Fellowship., 1996, S. G4591

13. Strong, James: The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible : Showing Every Word of the Text of the Common English Version of the Canonical Books, and Every Occurrence of Each Word in Regular Order. electronic ed. Ontario : Woodside Bible Fellowship., 1996, S. G5059

14. Thomas, Robert L.: New American Standard Hebrew-Aramaic and Greek Dictionaries : Updated Edition. Anaheim : Foundation Publications, Inc., 1998, 1981, S. H8674

15. Kittel, Gerhard (Hrsg.) ; Bromiley, Geoffrey William (Hrsg.) ; Friedrich, Gerhard (Hrsg.): Theological Dictionary of the New Testament. electronic ed. Grand Rapids, MI : Eerdmans, 1964-c1976, S. 8:124

16. Strong, James: The Exhaustive Concordance of the Bible : Showing Every Word of the Text of the Common English Version of the Canonical Books, and Every Occurrence of Each Word in Regular Order. electronic ed. Ontario : Woodside Bible Fellowship., 1996, S. G2041.

17. Kittel, Gerhard (Hrsg.) ; Bromiley, Geoffrey William (Hrsg.) ; Friedrich, Gerhard (Hrsg.): Theological Dictionary of the New Testament. electronic ed. Grand Rapids, MI : Eerdmans, 1964-c1976, S. 2:635

18. Kittel, Gerhard (Hrsg.) ; Bromiley, Geoffrey William (Hrsg.) ; Friedrich, Gerhard (Hrsg.): Theological Dictionary of the New Testament. electronic ed. Grand Rapids, MI : Eerdmans, 1964-c1976, S. 2:636

19. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. Wheaton, Standard Bible Society, 2001. Jn. 5:17 (ESV, emphasis added, partial verse)

20. The Holy Bible: English Standard Version. Wheaton, Standard Bible Society, 2001. Col. 1:19

 

Home | About | Testimonies | Links | Articles | Contact

© 2007 Miraculous Love Ministries All Rights Reserved